Australian researchers identifies probable cause of Alzheimer’s disease

SYDNEY: Australian researchers have in a pioneering study identified a 'blood-to-brain pathway' that can lead to Alzheimer's disease, offering potential new prevention and treatment opportunities for the debilitating brain disorder, which is the most prevalent form of dementia globally. The study, led by a cohort team at Curtin University in Perth, Australia, tested on mouse models, identified that a probable cause of Alzheimer's disease was the leakage from blood into the brain of fat-carrying particles transporting toxic proteins. The findings are published in the journal PLOS Biology.

Lead investigator Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI) Director Professor John Mamo said his collaborative group of Australian scientists had identified the probable 'blood-to-brain pathway' that can lead to Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent form of dementia globally.

"While we previously knew that the hallmark feature of people living with Alzheimer's disease was the progressive accumulation of toxic protein deposits within the brain called beta-amyloid, researchers did not know where the amyloid originated from, or why it deposited in the brain," said lead investigator Professor John Mamo, Director at Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI).

"This 'blood-to-brain pathway' is significant because if we can manage the levels in blood of lipoprotein-amyloid and prevent their leakage into the brain, this opens up potential new treatments to prevent Alzheimer's disease and slow memory loss," Mamo added.

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