Covid vaccination protects infection, severe disease in kidney dialysis patients

 Multiple studies have found that people with kidney failure or who are on dialysis have lesser antibody responses after receiving the Covid-19 vaccine, but new study suggests that these people's immune responses are still capable of protecting them from SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe sickness.

Individuals who got a single Covid vaccination dose were 41 percent less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2 and 46 percent less likely to develop severe Covid-19 that required hospitalisation or ended in death, according to the study published in JASN.

Those who had received two doses were 69 percent less likely to become infected and 83 percent less likely to develop severe disease, respectively. On the other hand, the risk of hospitalisation in the unvaccinated group was 52 percent, with a mortality rate of 16 percent, whereas the risk of hospitalisation in the 2-dose group was 30 percent, with a mortality rate of 10 percent.

"Patients on maintenance dialysis frequently have reduced immune systems, and many are unable to isolate since they must go to dialysis three times a week in a dialysis centre," said Matthew Oliver of the University of Toronto in Canada. "Reducing hospitalizations and fatalities in this cohort is critical because about two-thirds of these patients were hospitalised and one in four died early in the pandemic when infected with SARS-CoV-2," he noted.

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