Kids Born to mothers given seasonal flu vaccine are not at risk of developing health hazards: Study

Jun 10 2021 09:57 AM
Kids Born to mothers given seasonal flu vaccine are not at risk of developing health hazards: Study

Influenza, often known as seasonal flu, is a viral infection that affects the respiratory system, including the lungs, nose, and throat. Studies suggest that it is a must for pregnant woman to get a flu vaccine to protect themselves against flu, particularly with a hormonal change going on in their body.

A population-based study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has found flu vaccination during pregnancy does not lead to an increased risk of adverse early childhood health outcomes.

Safety concerns are reportedly a leading reason people may not receive influenza vaccination in pregnancy. Dr Deshayne Fell, an Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa and a Scientist at the CHEO Research Institute, a pediatric healthcare and research centre, led the study along with researchers in Ontario and at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia.

The study followed over 28,000 children from birth up to an average age of 3.5 years, with the results suggesting that maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy was not linked to the following aspects:-

1) 10 Asthma, ear infections, and other illnesses that are caused by the immune system- 2) Non-immune-related health problems like neoplasms, sensory impairment. 3) Non-specific health requirements, such as trips to the emergency room and hospitalizations, did not rise.

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