British Government had honoured Tagore with 'Sir', he returned the title after Jallianwala Bagh Scandal

Aug 06 2020 12:41 PM
British Government had honoured Tagore with 'Sir', he returned the title after Jallianwala Bagh Scandal

Rabindranath Tagore earned a name in the whole world including India due to his writing. Rabindranath Tagore is also called 'Gurudev'. He was a versatile person. He won Nobel Prize for his writing. The whole world is familiar with 'Gurudev' Rabindranath Tagore. Rabindranath Tagore was born on 7 May 1861 in Kolkata, the capital of West Bengal.

Rabindranath is known for many things, although the special thing is that Rabindranath is the first Indian to get the Nobel Prize. He is also the first non-European to receive this honour. In the year 1913, he was bestowed the Nobel Prize for Literature. Tagore was awarded the Nobel Prize for his world-famous book 'Geetanjali'. A total of 157 poems are included in this book. Rabindranath did not directly take the Nobel Prize. Rather this honour was taken by an ambassador of Britain on his behalf, then it was handed over to Rabindranath Tagore.

One of the special things related to Rabindranath is that he was honoured with the title of 'Sir' by the British government after being influenced by him. However, Tagore returned this title in the year 1919 after the Jallianwala Bagh scandal. The British government did not agree to take it, although Tagore, on the other hand, was adamant.

'Gurudev' Rabindranath Tagore wrote national anthem for two countries. The national anthem of India 'Jan Gan Man' and, the national anthem 'Amar Shonar Bangla',  of Bangladesh.

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